New 911 GT3: figures explained

Yesterday’s unveiling of the new 911 GT3 at the 2013 Geneva Motor Show revealed several changes to Porsche’s universally admired, naturally aspirated road-going sports car, which now boasts a 0-62 time of 3.5 seconds and an impressive Nurburgring lap time of 7 minutes 30 seconds.

The new 911 GT3 shaves an incredible 0.7 seconds from the 0-62mph time of the outgoing 997 variant.

Chief among the changes is the decision to discontinue the ‘Mezger era’ of GT3 engines, with the new 991 GT3 instead adopting a vastly reworked version of the direct-injection 991 Carrera S unit. A specifically adapted crankshaft and valve train, plus titanium con rods and forged pistons are all part of the new engine which now revs all the way to a glorious, motorsport inspired 9,000 rpm, with the maximum 475bhp extracted from the 3.8-litre flat six at the heady height of 8,250rpm. Make no mistake then, the new unit loves to rev like never before.

Elsewhere for the first time, Porsche have only made the GT3 available with seven speed PDK (Porsche Doppelkupplung)  transmission. Although the move was widely expected, the decision by Porsche to offer PDK-only GT3s has undoubtedly ruffled the feathers of purists previously smitten with the stripped back, raw nature of a GT3. We think then that despite the initial outcry, the PDK-only new GT3 will be a sales success, with a manual option not likely to be offered in the future.

PDK paddles and gear shifter are a standout evolution to the new GT3's interior.

The new GT3 also benefits from active rear-wheel steering, where the angle of the rear wheels can be altered by up to 1.5 degrees depending on the speed of the car. Up to 31mph, the system steers the rear wheels in the opposite direction to the front wheels, reducing the turning radius. At speeds above 50mph the rear wheels are directed in the same direction as the front wheels, providing a geometric virtual wheel extension of up to 500mm, ensuring an increase in stability effective at high speeds. A further aid to agility can also be found at the rear of the car. In an aesthetical first, the new 911 GT3 is 44mm wider than a 911 Carrera S across the rear axle, meaning the new GT3 does not adopt the traditional narrow body of the model’s Carrera 2 variant.

Fixed rear wing remains, active rear wheel steering is a new development.

The new 991 GT3 is available to preorder now with prices starting at £100,540. First deliveries of right-hand-drive examples can be expected by November of this year. An in-depth examination of the new 911 GT3 can be found in issue 99 of Total 911, released on 27th March. what do you think of the new GT3? Tweet us your thoughts to @Total911 or email us on editorial@total911.co.uk.

Comments (5)

  • Larry Cable

    note that the “traditional” GT3 narrow body always adopted the ‘4’ variant body shell due to its additional “stiffness”… not the ‘2’.

    🙂

  • The new GT3 is simply a brilliant design. Owning a PDK equipped 991 Carrera S and Panamera S, the superiority and convenience of this transmission, both for road and track, over a manual is undeniable.
    MT RIP! I am looking forward to seeing the actual lap times of the new GT3 on the Nurburgring.

  • Nick Dawson

    I changed my 997 GT3 for a 991 S with PDK last year. The PDK is superb, much more satisfying on the track than the manual, and the track is the only place where the GT3 makes any sense. Porsche’s decision to offer PDK only on the new GT3 is very logical, and is only controversial to those so called “911 purists” who object instinctively to any move Porsche make to update the car..

  • Andrew

    Yes I do like that. Some deep dish wheels would finish it off nicely.

  • Alfonso

    I did not know that April Fools day (first day in April) was also observed in Europe. Ha, ha, ha, very funny joke.

    Porsche WILL provide an option with proper manual gear shift!!!